Amazon is financing a pilot who will support the launch of the new bachelor's degree programs in Seattle Community and Technical Schools and throughout the State of Washington, an investment aimed at addressing a shortage of workforce that Plagone the giant of electronic commerce and other employers who can not find qualified candidates for computer science posts without stories.

While half of the United States now allows community universities to offer undergraduate degrees, the experts called $ 3 million of significant Amazon investments in part because the company has said. To contract many graduates of the program, noting that a Fortune 100 company believes that you can find the best talents in community and technical universities. Amazon's money will be divided among three entities, with $ 1 million going to Seattle Schools, the City Community System; $ 1 million going to the Washington State Board, technical universities to develop study plans to help launch computing science degrees into community and technical schools through the state of Washington; and $ 1 million going to the Washington State Opportunities Scholarship to benefit students seeking undergraduate degrees related to STEM.

Imports from Washington State four times as many graduates of computer as it creates, according to State Senator Joe Nguyen, who defended the new legislation that allows the state community and technical schools to offer titles of Bachelor in computer science. Nguyen said he sponsored the invoice in part because the technological sector currently has more than 24,000 working openings, which mainly require a bachelor's degree in science in computing. Only 1,883 computing science titles were awarded in the state during the 2018-19 school year.

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    Shouan Pan, Chancellor de Seattle Colleges, said that the three community colleges on their system will use the new undergraduate program to draw various students that excel in stem programs in schools Public of Seattle. It is estimated that 278,000 students attend the 34 Community universities and Washington techniques each year, and almost half of them are underrepresented funds. Carli Schiffner, the Deputy Executive Director of Education for the State Board of Community Colleges and Technicians, said the computing science inscriptions in the state community and the technical university system are increasing even as decreasing in general registration.

    Bread called the Amazon Gift A "game changer", even if an investment is not as big, as it could have been.

    "has a symbolic impact that says: 'We believe in community colleges," said Pan. He added that Amazon has been criticized for not being a "greater corporate citizen", so the "full donation It is a very good and strong step forward. " googleg.cmd.push (function () googleg.display ("dfp-ad-article_in_article"););

    PAN noticed that Seattle's universities have worked with Amazon before, citing Amazon Web Services, which has helped develop donated curricula and technology products to support a cloud computing certificate program. But she said that $ 1 million in seed money to create a computer science degree program is significant, especially due to the emphasis that the company is placing in the training of local and unattended local fund students.

    Pan said that she wants to nourish more talent to helmets to fill out the many technology works that remain vacancies in local companies, such as Amazon and Microsoft.

    "We have to cultivate local talents," said Pan. "We want to work with Amazon, Microsoft, any large operation, because nobody can do it alone."

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